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Retailer Resources

Public safety is a team effort. Servers, bartenders and other employees at bars, restaurants and stores are the first line of defense against underage drinking and drunk driving.

Underage Drinking and Alcohol Sales

Making sure you don't sell alcohol to minors is good business and it's the law. Making alcoholic beverages available to a minor is a class A misdemeanor punishable by:

  • A fine of up to $4,000.
  • A year in jail.
  • Automatic 180-day driver's license suspension.

Checking IDs

Businesses have the legal right to ask for IDs to verify someone's age when purchasing alcohol. Although companies are not required to check IDs, businesses can be held administratively responsible and their employees can be held criminally responsible for selling to someone under 21.

Under the law, permittees can claim Safe Harbor if they or their employees took steps to ensure they checked IDs, all employees had a current TABC certification, and rules were posted at the establishment about checking IDs and not selling to minors or intoxicated people. An ID needs to meet all these requirements:

  • Has a physical description and photograph consistent with the minor's appearance.
  • Purports to establish that the minor is 21 or older.
  • Was issued by a governmental agency.

Acceptable types of ID include a driver's license issued by any state, a U.S. passport, a military identification card or any other ID issued by a state or the federal government.

Drinking and Driving

Overserving and overconsuming alcohol can have serious — even deadly — consequences. Employees of TABC licensed and permitted businesses play a role in preventing drunk driving. By following state laws, servers can do their part to keep roads safe.

For more information about DWIs, visit these websites:

Underage Drinking and Driving

It’s illegal for someone under 21 to get behind the wheel with any detectable alcohol in their system. The laws also apply to watercraft.

Learn more at TABC’s Underage Drinking Laws page.

Retailer Education and Awareness Program

Each time employees stop service to a minor or intoxicated person, they are protecting themselves, the business and the community from serious consequences.

The Retailer Education and Awareness Program (REAP) provides owners, managers and general employees of retail establishments continued education to help them follow the state’s alcoholic beverage laws. REAP training is often required when an administrative case is settled, but retailers can request the training at any time.

Contact the auditing staff at your regional office to request training.

Agents and auditors will cover topics like:

Helpful Links