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TABC 2021 Changes FAQs

General

Yes. Learn more about the app on our Compliance Reporting page.

Temporary Licensing Process in 2021

Because each application is different and processing times can vary, you should submit your application as soon as possible. Use your own judgement to ensure your application is completed on time. Your application is only considered complete to meet the July 31 deadline if you do both of the following:

  1. Answer all questions, get all necessary certifications, make all required publications, etc. If any items are missing in the application, we’ll deem it incomplete and send it back to you.
  2. Submit your payment for application fees and surcharges by July 31, after receiving a “remit payment” notice by email from TABC. (Submit your applications with enough time for TABC to send you a “remit payment” notice, and for you to respond by mailing the requested payment to TABC by July 31.)

Here is some information to help you decide when to submit your application:

  • TABC makes every effort to quickly check that you answered all questions, secured all necessary certifications and submitted required publications. This part usually takes about three business days.
  • If we find incomplete information, our TABC team will note this and return the incomplete application.
  • If we find all the correct information has been submitted, we’ll email a remit payment notice in a few business days after completing the first verification.
  • Once you receive the remit payment notice, you must mail the remittance form and payment to TABC headquarters.
  • TABC must receive your payment by July 31 for your application to be considered complete (mailed payment postmarked July 31 and sent to TABC headquarters will count towards a completed application).

Payment will only be accepted at TABC headquarters in Austin, not field offices. TABC will email a remit payment form with a return address for TABC headquarters in Austin.

If that happens, you must re-apply in September using the Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS).

As a reminder, your application is only considered complete to meet the July 31 deadline if you do both of the following:

  1. Answer all questions, get all necessary certifications, make all required publications, etc. If any items are missing in the application, we’ll deem it incomplete and send it back to you.
  2. Submit your payment for application fees and surcharges by July 31, after receiving a “remit payment” notice by email from TABC. (Submit your completed applications with enough time for TABC to send you a “remit payment” notice, and for you to respond by mailing the requested payment to TABC by July 31.)

Here is some information to help you decide when to submit your application:

  • TABC makes every effort to quickly check that you answered all questions, secured all necessary certifications and submitted required publications. This part usually takes about three business days.
  • If we find incomplete information, our TABC team will note this and return the incomplete application.
  • If we find all the correct information has been submitted, we’ll email a remit payment notice in a few business days after completing the first verification.
  • Once you receive the remit payment notice, you must mail the remittance form and payment to TABC headquarters.
  • TABC must receive your payment by July 31 for your application to be considered complete (mailed payment postmarked July 31 and sent to TABC headquarters will count towards a completed application).

License Renewals

The answer is both. You have 30 days before and 30 days after your license expiration date to renew.

You may file renewal applications starting 30 days before the license or permit expires, according to TABC Rule 33.3(d) and Alcoholic Beverage Code Section 6.04.

Code Section 6.04 also says a license holder who hasn’t filed a renewal application by their license’s expiration date may not operate until the holder files their renewal application with all required fees.

However, TABC Rule 33.16 says that a license holder with an expiration date in September 2021 must wait to apply for renewal until Sept. 1. You will also renew in the Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS).

View our Temporary License Process webpage.

View our Technology Changes webpage.

No. Your renewal fee is based on your license expiration date, regardless of when you submit your renewal application. If your expiration date is in August, you will pay the old (pre-Sept. 1) fees and renew under the old license structure.

View the TABC 2021 Changes webpage to learn more.

TABC Rule 33.16 says that a license holder with an expiration date in September 2021 must wait to apply for renewal until Sept. 1. You will also renew in the Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS).

View our Temporary License Process webpage.

View our Technology Changes webpage.

Any license expiring before Sept. 1 will use the current online renewal process.

Yes. Check the status of your renewal application through our TABC License Application Status page. If we’ve received your renewal application, the status will show as “Pending Renewal.” You may continue to operate if you have this status.

Temporary Event Changes

No. TABC will allow permit holders and nonprofits to submit their application forms starting 30 days before the event. Usually, we approve the forms the week before the temporary event. 

TABC’s temporary event process is changing on Sept. 1. To prepare for this, we’ll make the new temporary event authorization forms available on our website by Aug. 1 for events happening on or after Sept. 1. New forms include:

  • File and Use Notification and Temporary Event Approval request forms for permit holders.
  • Nonprofit Entity Temporary Event Permit (NETE)application for non-permittees or nonprofits.

Submit using the old (pre-Sept. 1) forms and processes for events happening before Sept. 1.

In September, you’ll be able to submit temporary event authorizations through the Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS). Get more details on temporary event authorizations in Chapter 33, Subchapter E of the TABC Rules.

Yes, if you submit your temporary event approval requests or nonprofit entity temporary event applications within 10 days of an event. However, if approved, you will get the authorization at no cost if you submit your request before that deadline.

We’ll be making three new temporary event authorization forms available on the website Aug. 1 for events taking place on or after Sept. 1, so you can submit forms on time.  Because license and permit holders and nonprofits won’t have access to AIMS until Sept. 1, applicants will need to submit these forms by email (forms will include specific instructions and email addresses). You should use AIMS to submit your requests and applications for events beginning in mid-September.

To prepare for the temporary event changes, we’ll make the new temporary event authorization forms available on our website by Aug. 1 for events happening on or after Sept. 1. New forms include:

  • File and Use Notification and Temporary Event Approval request forms for permit holders.
  • Nonprofit Entity Temporary Event Permit (NETE) application for non-permittees or nonprofits. 

TABC will allow permit holders and nonprofits to submit their application forms starting 30 days before the event. Usually, we approve the forms the week before the temporary event. 

Before Sept. 1:

  • License and permit holders who host a temporary event can’t get a temporary license or certificate for more than four days at a time.
  • Because the State Fair is a multi-week event, you’d get multiple licenses or certificates to extend your time at the State Fair.

Starting Sept. 1:

  • On-premise retailers and wineries can hold temporary events without a separate license. The time will still be limited to four days, and you must request temporary event approval for any event that qualifies for the file-and-use-notification process under TABC Rules (for small private events).
  • Nonprofits can also hold an event for up to 10 days if approved for a Nonprofit Entity Temporary Event Permit (NETE). (Find more details on temporary event authorizations in Chapter 33, Subchapter E of the TABC Rules.)
  • State Fair: Because the State Fair is a unique event, we recommend you work with and submit completed forms to the TABC’s Arlington Regional Office for approval.
  • If you need to submit a temporary event form before your scheduled AIMS onboarding time, you can use the new PDF forms that will be posted to the TABC website Aug. 1 to apply for events happening Sept. 1 or later. Then, once you onboard into AIMS based at your scheduled time, we encourage you to start using AIMS to submit authorization requests for temporary events. See the onboarding schedule.

Because the State Fair starts in late September, late filing fees (according to TABC Rule 33.74) shouldn’t be a problem because you can submit requests and applications at least 10 business days before the first event.

We strongly encourage everyone to use AIMS to submit their temporary event approval requests or other forms once they onboard into AIMS at their scheduled time. See the onboarding schedule. If you need to submit a temporary event form before your scheduled AIMS onboarding time, you may use the new PDF forms that will be posted to the TABC website Aug. 1 to apply for events happening Sept. 1 or later.

When AIMS launches Sept. 1, we will continue to offer forms you can download on the TABC website. You can email completed forms to the regional temporary events email addresses. Requests and forms will be sent to the correct region for approval, if needed.

Yes. You’ll still need to work with your local jurisdiction to get the necessary approvals for temporary events. You’ll submit these approvals to TABC through AIMS along with other required documentation, such as sponsorship agreements, if applicable.

License Fees

The proposed two-year license and permit fees have been published on our License Changes page. You can also find all revisions to Chapter 33 of the TABC Rules that are up for discussion at the June 2 Stakeholder Meeting through our Agency Meetings page.

Other Helpful Resources

In 2019, the 86th Texas Legislature directed TABC to consolidate 75 licenses down to 37 licenses by Sept. 1, 2021. Because of these changes, most businesses will need only one TABC license to operate.

By law, TABC must also set a single state fee for each license in our rules. This change will end the old patchwork of statutory fees and administrative surcharges and allow most businesses to focus on a single fee.

Learn more and see the proposed two-year license fees on our License Changes page.

New License Structure

Yes, as long as your primary license is still current. On Sept. 1, all Mixed Beverage Permit (MB) holders, for example, can conduct an event at a temporary location. The same authority will be given to all on-premise retailers and wineries. This authority is given regardless of whether the retailer currently holds a catering permit, temporary permit or winery festival permit. Learn more about temporary event authorizations in Chapter 33, Subchapter E of the TABC Rules. Many events will still require TABC approval, at no cost, as spelled out in the new rules.

If you hold a Mixed Beverage Permit (MB) in a hotel and want to install minibars before Sept. 1, you must have a Minibar Permit (MI). As with any original (new) application, your application must be considered completed by July 31 (according to TABC Rule 33.16).

On Sept. 1 and after, hotels with MB permits will be allowed to have minibars without needing to submit diagrams.

To avoid public health concerns related to aging product, TABC does not recommend keeping beer inventory for such a long time. If you intend to continue selling beer under the Q permit after Sept. 1, you should do one of the following:

  • Renew your BF license when it’s due.
  • Sell your beer inventory before it expires.
  • Sell the rest of the inventory to another retailer authorized to sell beer. Use Form C-709, Alcoholic Beverage Inventory to document this sale.

No. For licenses and permits changing due to consolidation and other statutory changes, you won’t need a bond rider.

In general, there will be nothing you need to do to make sure your license type is up to date. TABC is using the new structure and fees in AIMS. Your new, correct license or permit type will appear when you onboard and claim your business in the system.

In some cases, license holders will need to decide — on their first renewal that occurs on or after Sept. 1 — whether they still need certain licenses based on their specific business activities.  For example:

  • Nonresident sellers who currently hold a Nonresident Brewer’s Permit (U) may no longer need a Nonresident Seller’s Permit (S) when they renew in AIMS the first time. If your business only sells malt beverages — and not wine (including cider) or distilled spirits — you will only need a Nonresident Brewer’s License (BN) going forward to import any malt beverage. The new BN License replaces the current Nonresident Manufacturer’s License (BS) and Nonresident Brewer’s Permit (U)]. 
  • Similarly, a business that holds a General Distributor’s License (BB) and Wholesaler’s Permit (W) or a General Class B Wholesaler’s Permit (X) will need to decide if they still need both. If the business only distributes malt beverages, only the BB is required starting Sept. 1. But if the business also sells wine or distilled spirits, they will still need both the BB and the W or X. The business can make this decision the first time they renew in AIMS.

Generally, yes, until the transition process is complete.  The entire onboarding process will take up to 11 months—making dual bookkeeping necessary during that time.  We can’t use current license numbers in AIMS because the new system uses an auto-generated numeric-only format that will be paired with the license or permit moniker (example: MB-12345 or BB-98765).  The numeric-only format means that the current license and permit numbers can’t be used because there would be duplicate numbers. We suggest you maintain your current records of retailers’ existing license or permit number and change over to the new AIMS-generated number once each retailer has onboarded into AIMS.  Because the AIMS onboarding process is slated to run from August 2021 through July 2022, this dual bookkeeping process could last up to 11 months.

Certifications and Notices

Yes. Any certifications you got or publications issued in the months before you apply in the Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS) will not be refused based on when you got the signatures or published the notice. However, the documents must be uploaded into AIMS after Sept. 1.

Yes. The Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS) will ask questions similar to those in the current prequalification packet and application. AIMS will use your answers to those questions to pre-fill the certification form. You can download the form from AIMS to provide to the local government contact. Once the form is signed, you’ll upload it into AIMS to continue the application process.

The Alcohol Industry Management System (AIMS) will make city and county certifications easier for you and local governments. When you answer questions and fill out information in AIMS, the system will automatically add relevant information to your city and county certification forms. This will make the forms easier for you to submit, and reduce errors compared to handwritten forms, to help cities and counties.

Local Government

Very little will change for local fees, and TABC’s fees set in rule are generally not relevant. Here’s why:

  • The law states that local fees must be based on statutory fees in effect Aug. 31, 2021. 
  • TABC must post current statutory fees on our website as a resource for local governments.  
  • Two licenses are exceptions: Local fees for the newly consolidated Brewer’s License and the Brewer’s Self-Distribution License will be based on the fees TABC sets in rule.  Pending the governor’s signature of HB 3897 (87th Legislature), Sec. 61.36 (a-1), local governments may charge up to 50% of the fees set in rule specifically for these two licenses. The two licenses are an exception because they won’t have corresponding statutory fees as of Aug. 31, because they are new on Sept. 1.

The new alcohol license and permit structure can be found on our License Changes page. Many of the licenses and permits are the same, some will be consolidated, and 24 will go away altogether.